2019: The Year of Hope

As cliche as it may sound, I try to have a word of the year. It took me some time to come up with this year’s word. I contemplated strength, tenacity, perseverance…but in the end I realized it all boiled down to HOPE.

 
theyearofhope.png
 

The end of 2018 well less than stellar. I was plagued by sickness, in turmoil over family issues, exhausted and just over it—life, blogging, business. In fact, I spent 3 days in my PJs watching Hallmark and crying intermittently. I felt helpless and alone. But you know what, I wasn’t.

After having a small breakdown on Instastories I was amazed at the outpouring of love and support. From blog friends I talk to everyday to people I have never interacted with just reaching out and sending love and prayer. I was overcome with emotion and just how much I am cared for in this space. And for what God was trying to show me.

You see, I found myself in a place of why me, why now, why this.. the ever-looming exclamation that life isn’t supposed to be this way. And bent on my knees asking how am I to move on.

It was then that I realized I am exactly where I am supposed to be. Each and every situation, obstacle, demise, failure and triumph was designed by Him for me. And no matter how gosh darn hard I fight it, His will is powerful. It was then that I realized this will be the year of Hope.

And not the I hope this will happen or willing into existence something, but in the steadfast feeling of trust that I am on the path I was destined to walk.

 
social-curato-12-2018-42.JPG
 

Professor of Psychology Barbara Fredrickson argues that hope comes into its own when crisis looms, opening us to new creative possibilities. Frederickson argues that with great need comes an unusually wide range of ideas, as well as such positive emotions as happiness and joy, courage, and empowerment, drawn from four different areas of one’s self: from a cognitive, psychological, social, or physical perspective. Hopeful people are "like the little engine that could, [because] they keep telling themselves "I think I can, I think I can". Such positive thinking bears fruit when based on a realistic sense of optimism, not on a naive "false hope".

So this year I will set realistic goals and pursue genuine friendships and relationships. I will focus only on what I can control and do only what I am capable of without interfering with family. I will trust that he is guiding me in the right direction and using me to inspire people where I can. I will have Hope.